AECB History

1989
AECB  – the Sustainable Building Association
was founded by Keith and Sally Hall  as The Association of Environment Conscious Builders , with a quarterly newsletter sent to members.

1990
The name was changed to The Association for Environment Conscious Building to reflect more accurately the diverse membership. Subscription rates were introduced and the first issue of the AECB’s Products and Services Directory was published.

1991
The first issue of ‘Building for a Future’ in magazine format was produced.

1992
The Greener Building products and services directory, written by Keith Hall and Peter Warm, was published. It was launched by Professor Chris Baines.

1993
The first Annual General Meeting, attended by 67 members, was held at the Earth Centre, in Birmingham. Professor Chris Baines became its President and the first Steering Committee was appointed, chaired by Peter Warm.

1994
Andy Simmonds won the design competition for the AECB’s first logo.

1995
The AECB website was created by Keith Hall  – www.aecb.net. The second AGM was held at the Bishopswood Centre, Worcestershire.

1996
The AECB Charter was written and adopted at the AGM held at the Pit Hill Community Centre, Bradford. This event included workshops, talks and a social event. The AECB also contributed to the Greenpeace publication, ‘Building the Future; a guide to building without PVC’.

1997
The fourth AGM was held at the Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth. The first AECB Year Book, Directory of Members was written and published. Unit One, Dyfi Eco Parc was the first recipient of SPEC (the AECB’s Sustainable Projects Endorsement Certificate).
Keith and Sally Hall received the 1997 Schumacher Award for their work in establishing the Association and for “working to transform society in the Schumacher tradition”.

1998
The fifth AGM was at Construction Resources, London and it attracted a record attendance of 100 members. The AECB joined the body to advise on the greening of the Heathrow Terminal 5 building. The Members’ Directory was re-named ‘The Real Green Building Book’.

1999
The AECB and RICS held a joint conference, ‘Sustaining our Heritage – the way forward for energy efficient historic buildings’, which was held in London. The sixth AGM took place at the Earth Balance Centre, Northumberland. The Association first registered its own domain name ‘aecb.net’.

2000
Membership exceeds 1000 for the first time. The seventh AGM was held at The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge. Distribution of The Real Green Building Book topped 5000 copies. The association joined SETCO, later to become The Phone Co-op.

2001
The AECB collaborated with BRE on its web-based project “Sustainability – getting the SME’s questions answered”. The Pestalozzi Children’s Village trust near Hastings was the venue for the eighth AGM.

2002
The preliminary work commenced to change the legal status of the AECB to a Company Limited by Guarantee, replacing the steering committee with a board of trustees. The ninth AGM was held at the National Botanic Garden, Wales. Peter Warm stood down as Chair.  Mark Gorgolewski took over and for a period was joint Chair with Lucy Pedler before Mark moved abroad.

2003
The tenth AGM was held at The Earth Centre, Doncaster. Andrew Simmonds was appointed Chair. It was agreed that the Green Building Press would publish Building for a Future independently under contract to the AECB. The first AECB training initiative was established.

2004
The new website was launched. The AECB’s training initiative was formalised and named SussEd – Sustainable Skills and Education. The eleventh AGM was held at The Weald and Downland Museum.

2005
The AECB’s first Executive Officer, Andy Simmonds, was appointed as a paid post and Chris Herring became Chair. The Association became a Company Limited by Guarantee and the steering committee members were appointed as directors. The twelfth AGM was held at SCAT (Somerset College of Arts and Technology) in Taunton, Somerset, where the Genesis Project was under construction.

Recent years: AECB the sustainable building association, 2006 – present

2006/2007
The AECB was officially transferred to the new not for profit limited company, AECB Ltd. The 2006 conference and AGM was held in the new Genesis Centre, Taunton, Somerset.

December 2006 saw the Government launch its target of ‘zero carbon homes’ by 2016. Shortly after this, during 2007, the AECB inaugurated its Carbonlite Programme – a crash course in energy efficient, low carbon design and building. The CLP was a key development for the AECB and was built on the expertise of members, and supported members in building truly low energy buildings. Its aim was to reach a wide audience (particularly within the design and construction industries) to offer advice for clients and developers, as well as for occupiers. The Carbon Trust and Esmee Fairbairn Foundation were its main funders. The CLP comprises energy standards, a description of principles and methodologies for calculating heat loss and emissions, a comprehensive training programme, a web-site with a forum and a database of buildings with measured energy results (www.carbonlite.net).

The AECB also became an active participant in the PASS-NET project, which worked in well with CLP. PASS-NET was a three-year European programme which aimed to promote low energy and low carbon buildings within Europe. This project continued to create valuable and productive relationships with international partner organisations in other European countries, all working to promote sustainable low energy buildings across Europe.

AECB regional groups were set up to provide the opportunity for members to meet and network with others. The website on-line forum allowed members to discuss key issues in sustainable construction and was well used by its members. The AECB’s ‘member’s profile’ feature also went live this year on the website, allowing members to enhance their listings with additional information and photographs.

2007/8
The 2007 conference and AGM was held at the Rivergreen Centre, Durham.

This period saw the completion of the majority of the initial phase of the Carbonlite Programme. The outcome was a training programme and some key tools based on international best practice, particularly the German Passivhaus methodology.

The programme continued to gain momentum, resulting in increasing ‘carbon literacy’ within the industry, and importantly, it started to influence policy makers. Over 200 individuals attended CLP training courses, key documents were downloaded thousands of times, and Carbonlite had an undoubted influence on the form of the proposed new Building Regulations for 2010, 2013 and beyond.

The AECB launched the CLP at Ecobuild at a sell-out session, and ran ‘ask the expert’ stand at the Home Building and Renovating Shows. It also had stands at the Glastonbury Festival, Greener Homes and Buildings and several smaller regional events.

This period also witnessed an expansion of the regional groups network, enabling committed members to meet together regularly for informal information exchange, events and social activities.

2008
A large amount of work this year went into the highly successful Carbonlite programme, helping to take the UK forward in truly effective measures to address carbon emissions from new and refurbished buildings. An increasing number of projects started using the Carbonlite guidance in their development and detail design stages.

The 2008 conference and AGM was held at the University of East Anglia and in November 2008 the AECB hosted the first ever public talk in the UK by Dr Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passivhaus Institut in Germany.

Four well-attended Passivhaus Planning Package courses were organized and a visit to Belgium set up for 2009, partly supported through European funding as part of the PASS-NET project.

Preparatory work continued towards the establishment of an organisation that would promote the Passivhaus standard within the UK, as a wholly owned subsidiary company of the AECB.

2009
The Board agreed to use the name ‘AECB, the sustainable building association’ for all promotional purposes.

The AECB Water Standards and the widely acclaimed Carbonlite Passivhaus / Gold Detailed Design Guidance were published. The very popular Belgium visit organised under PASS-NET took place in May, enabling delegates to see a number of Passivhaus buildings in action, first hand.

2009’s conference and agm was the most successful to date. Working closely with Oxford Brooks University, there was an excellent range of workshops and Dr Wolfgang Feist gave a series of seminars on Passivhaus . He also led a valuable discussion and exchange of ideas afterwards. He was filmed in conversation with Peter Warm (the AECB’s first Chair) – probably the first time that film of Dr Feist has been available on U-tube, certainly in English. (see the videos ). The event was sold out and the feedback was very positive.

The AECB provided technical support to the Technology Strategy Board’s Retrofit for the Future competition. The competition awarded £150,000 to each winning scheme to carry out a low-energy refurbishment project. The AECB worked with the TSB on upgrading the AECB buildings’ database in order that design and monitoring data from all the winning projects could be uploaded. The AECB assisted with the definition of the 80% CO2 reduction target, and advised on how competition participants should model their schemes to establish least cost options on a common basis.

Preparatory work continued towards the establishment of an organisation that would promote the Passivhaus standard within the UK, as a wholly owned subsidiary company of the AECB.

2009 closed with a packed one-day conference on Passivhaus Schools in London, supported by PASS-NET.

2010
In 2010, AECB established the Passivhaus Trust, a not-for-profit initiative with the key aim of promoting the reduction of energy use and carbon emissions from new and refurbished buildings. The Trust (www.passivhaustrust.org.uk) was set up to provide leadership in the UK for the adoption of the Passivhaus standard and methodology. The Trust has its own board and staff team, but will retain close working links with AECB and with other key organisations.

New courses continued to be developed and run under the CarbonLite programme by the AECB’s delivery partner, Warm, including a new module on ‘Delivering Airtight Buildings’.

The Low Energy Buildings Database was re-launched with additional graphical displays and search functions, and the first design data from Retrofit for the Future (RfF) projects began to be loaded alongside project data form AECB members’ new build and refurbishment projects.

As part of the AECB’s involvement with RfF, four short films of low-energy retrofits were produced, and published on www.aecb.net.

More new AECB local groups were formed, including two in Scotland.

The AECB celebrated its 21st birthday at the 2010 annual members’ conference (another sell out), held in October in the stunning new Welsh Institute for Sustainable Education at CAT, with AECB founders Keith and Sally Hall as guests of honour.

2011

The 2011 Conference was held in September and was branded Moving In and Moving On. This was chosen to coincide with the completion of many of the Retrofit for the Future projects funded by the Technology Strategy Board and looked at aspects of renovation and retrofit. Also addressed were issues such as community involvement, materials and usability.

During 2011,the  key involvement of AECB with the Technology Strategy Board in the Retrofit for the Future Programme demonstrated just how respected AECB is for its core expertise in this field. Involvement continues through the on-going work on the low energy database, established through the RFF programme, which is playing an important role, recognised by BRE, EST and the National Refurbishment Centre. The AECB also published Less is More key strategy paper, which was previewed at the conference.

The Technology Strategy Board agreed to fund further development of the AECB database to enhance its functionality, searchability and ability to share lessons learnt from the 87 Retrofit for the Future projects, and a further 33 low energy projects.

During July, we were pleased to welcome Gill Rivers as Business Operations Manager and Debbie Mauger was also appointed as Local Groups Co-ordinator.

2011 also saw the official launch of our AECB news platform on our website which allows us to share news items and events including local group news/events, member news and AECB articles. This also coincided with the introduction of our own Facebook Page.

The new news platform also allowed us to introduce an exciting new concept – Soapbox. This allows our members to make a short and concise case for something they are passionate about and to share their expertise with fellow members and the wider AECB audience.

In December, the AECB won a water industry award at SWIG (The Sustainable Water Industry Group). The standard is used by designers in both domestic and non-domestic buildings, to optimise the efficient and effective use of water and energy.

The AECB gave presentations and offered advice in the Ask the Experts area at both the Homebuilding and Renovating Show and Grand Designs Live which demonstrated that there is a huge demand for independent advice on a range of green building issues.

2012

The 2012 Annual Members’ Conference was held in June at the new Academic Buiding of Goldsmith’s College, London and was branded “Never Mind the Greenwash”.   The two day Conference coincided with a visit to the UK by Wolfgang Feist from the German Passivhaus Institute and a joint event was held on the Saturday with the Passivhaus Trust for members of the public.  The conference also featured an evening debate under the heading ‘Sustainability is more than just Energy’. This packed session began with contributions from a panel, with AECB’s Chief Executive, Andy Simmonds and long-standing AECB members Neil May of Natural Building Products and Pat Borer from the Centre for Alternative Technology.

In 2012 a Herefordshire based property development company, were very proud to have been awarded the Silver Certification from the AECB, the first development in the UK to receive this.  The building is designed to offer its occupants a 75-80% reduction in heating bills compared to standard homes.  AECB Silver Certification is a self-certification scheme open to building projects that meet the AECB Silver Standard design and performance criteria. The AECB self certification route has been developed whereby the self certifier (typically the building’s energy consultant) takes responsibility for certification and for underwriting the Silver Standard claim.

During 2012 the AECB entered into a new contract with the Passivhaus Institute to sell the 2012 Passive House Planning Package software (PHPP).   PHPP is a design tool for use by building architects and designers. Based on dynamic thermal simulations validated by data gathered from hundreds of low-energy buildings, PHPP is the software to use to calculate energy use and CO₂ emissions. PHPP’s level of sophistication enables it to take into account a wide range of variable characteristics which affect heat loss and subsequent energy use, allowing for a superior fit between predicted energy use and real-world performance.  Suitable for both residential and many non-residential applications, PHPP is supported by the AECB CLP courses (run by Warm Associates) to help you members get the most from this software.

 

 

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