Abstract

Few now doubt climate change and its impact on the world is one if not the most important challenge of our time. How we respond to this challenge is key to ensuring we leave the world in a better and sustainable condition for future generations.With homes contributing 27 % of the UK’s total carbon emissions, builders have a key role to play in rising to the challenge that we now face. I’m therefore delighted that the FMB has teamed up with the University of Oxford to examine how we can transform our existing homes to make them more energy efficient and greener. Given that 85% of our homes will still be standing in 2050 there is little time to waste if the UK is to achieve its ambitious target to cut carbon emissions by 80% by 2050.
Significant steps have already been made to tackle new build but for existing homes much remains to be done. It is therefore encouraging that this research tackles the issue in a practical way recognising that government, the construction sector, and the public all have a key role to play. FMB for its part will be taking forward the recommendations of this report and will be seeking to work with our partners, both existing and new, to translate the ideas and policies into reality.We have the opportunity now to build a greener Britain and we must not lose this opportunity whilst we still have a chance to do something. I therefore commend this report to everyone who not only wants to make our homes better and more sustainable places to live but is committed to handing over a more sustainable, energy efficient built environment to the next generation.

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Building a Greener Britain - Transforming the UK's Existing Housing Stock

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Additional information

  • http://www.fmb.org.uk/news-publications/newsroom/campaigns/building-a-greener-britain/ Orginating URL
  • 1 July 2008 Year of publication
  • Document accessibility
  • Relevant region
  • 1.0.0 Version
  • 339 Times downloaded
  • 1.30 MB File Size
  • 1 File Count
  • 20 November 2014 Creation Date
  • 25 September 2019 Last Updated