Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #46952
    T J Holt
    Participant

    Welcome to the new forum area for CarbonLite Retrofit students.
    Many of you will be starting Module 3 in Feb 2018 – so feel free to post any questions or thoughts, and get a discussion going between yourselves.
    We will look through these questions and may include some of the in the web tutorial with Bill Butcher on 5th March 2018.

    #47187
    Adam James
    Member

    What approach should you take when you encounter extensive wet rot in an existing stone wall that has been previously poorly retrofitted with layers of internal drylining and cement based render externally.

    #47246
    Ben Gorman
    Participant

    I’d be interested to hear any feedback on this. A neighbour has a mid-terrace with solid brick walls. They are having problems with damp penetrating from the exterior. The building company they are using are tackling it by putting a membrane on the interior walls to stop the damp entering the house. Surely this is not a good idea? Would it not be better to stop the damp entering the brick wall in the first place by improving the DPC? Otherwise the brickwork is still at risk of freeze-thaw damage during the winter.

    #47387
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Ben,

    I absolutely agree with you. Any fissures or spalling of the walls should be made good and then a product like Stormdry masonry cream should be applied. http://www.safeguardeurope.com/products/stormdry-system

    The proposed method is just storing up a miriad problems.

    By enabling the masonry to dry the neighbours should also notice increased comfort in their home.

    Tim

    #47405
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    PS. Some of the damp will be coming from next door each side so either the neighbours need to be pursuaded to do the same or a vertical damp course will be required at all 4 connections, and as it is from wetting the wall, not the existing DPC, that vertical DPC needs to extend from as low as they can get to the roof.
    This isn’t really a job for a builder but a specialist company. That way the neighbour should get a guarantee that can help sell the house when that day comes.

    Tim

    #47409
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi James

    To answer your question, perhaps a more general audience in one of the other forums could give better advice. Remember that you are addressing a group of students!

    For my part I would replace any lose render with something breathable but removing something fixed could cause more damage than it might treat.

    Where is the wet rot? Ground floor or higher? Not that I’d know what to do with it (yet). Where shallow crawl spaces exist there seems to be a preference in AECB to replace with a damproof and well insulated solid floor.

    Tim

    #47555
    T J Holt
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I am encouraging all CLR students (including those who have already graduated) to use this forum. And some students completing the CLR course have many years of retrofit experience, but would like to get the CLR certification.

    So there there will be some very knowledgeable students among you, as well as those who are relatively new to low energy refurbishment.

    Tina

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