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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)
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  • in reply to: Looking for Ground Source Heat pump system quote #39242
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    I am not sure why you would put a GDHP in a South London house.

    If you are renovating a house with access to mains gas installing a high quality Condensing Boiler with underfloor heating.

    This would be much cheaper than a GSHP and you could spend the money you save on high quality insulation, doors windows etc.

    On environmental grounds it is very unlikely that you would end making a saving on either energy use or CO2 emissions.

    many of the good companies that install HPs would advise against installing if you have mains Gas, 1 or 2 will refuse to do it.

    If you want to know more check out John Cantor Heat Pumps web site

    http://heatpumps.co.uk

    Hope this helps.

    Geoff

    in reply to: Almere, Netherlands #39184
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Hi. I visited Almere last year. I can't say anything about the green credentials of any of the buildings. Although many of them looked like they were going down that route. When I went the weather was very windy so the whole place was like being in a sandstorm so it all looked a bit bleak. Unfortunately this meant that we didn't get to have a chat with anyone. I would reccommend that you visit the information office in the city centre they were very helpful and had loads of info. Hope you enjoy and it would be good to hear your iompressions.

    in reply to: Wood Burning Stoves in passivhaus #39030
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    This seems to be the reasoning.

    pg29 Table1 of ADJ
    Air supply to solid fuel appliances – Other appliance, such as a stove, cooker or boiler, with no flue draught stabiliser – If design air permeability <= 5.0m^3/(h.m^2) then 550mm^2 per kW of appliance rated output, of permanently open vent

    I can't quote what the passive house rules are, but I susspect they are designed to have a air permeability of less than 5.0m^3/(h.m^2), and having 550mm^2 per kW of appliance rated output of open vent in the wall would not be allowed. This is the approved way of complying with the requirement under the building regulation to provide sufficient air supply to the appliance. You can install a appliance with a diect air supply as the only source of combustion air, but it is then upon you to prove that the installation complies with building regulations.

    HETAS have recently finished a detailed study into this, and although not published yet, the verdict I have heard is that simply fitting a direct air kit does not guarantee compliance, there are a number of factors affecting if it will or not. The final report from this is as far as I know yet to be published, but once it is will hopefully feed into future regulations allowing certain appliances under certain conditions to be fitted without the permanently open air vents. Currently though, if you want to install the appliance under ADJ, I don't think you can comply with it and the passive house code.

    in reply to: Thermal Roof Coatings. #38091
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Judging by the lack of details my feeling is that the product is just paint. I wouldn't touch it if I were you. Their information on Solar PV is way out of date as well. That doesn't inspire confidence.

    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Have a look at the range of courses on offer at the Centre for Alternative Technology at Machynlleth, Wales :

    http://gse.cat.org.uk/gse-postgraduate-study

    Any number of architects have used the courses to improve their understanding of sustainability, they are available either with attendance at CAT for six days a month or via Distance Learning. The MSc course has an intake starting in March 2012.

    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    I found this link that may be of interest.
    http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/sustainability-masters/

    in reply to: What to do with gaps in insulation in timber frame ? #38211
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    I agree with Dave the gaps should be filled especially if the porch is heated in any way. If you have any off cuts of foam it is easy to cut with a fine saw and slithers can be pushed in. I have not heard of any problems using foam filler but it can be difficult to get it in to very narrow gaps. I suggest you contact the insulation manufacturers and speak to their technical dept for advice just in case any of the foam filler reacts with the boards.

    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Martin Are you sure the cavity was filled with Warmcel? My understanding is that it is not suitable for cavity walls.
    You could use a thermal imaging camera to check the quality of the installation.

    Geoff

    in reply to: Thermal properties of I-beams #37770
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    When I spoke to a rep from Steico they said they had done that calculation. have you checked with them. If not they should be encouraged to do so.
    Geoff

    in reply to: The Energyflo Cell #37233
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    We will be having a presentation on Dynamic Insulation at this years Conference (The WISE Building @ CAT 1st & 2nd October). I will forward these points to the workshop leader to help inform the debate.

    in reply to: PassivHaus building cost #37244
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    I always advise people to be very wary of outline build costs because their are so many variables. £1000 per sq mtr is very low. It also depends on how much you plan to do yourself. having said that The Denby Dale House built by Green Building Store quotes figures of
    £141K build costs
    118m2 three-bed detached house.
    But the figure you need must be based on the exact house you are building. So many people underestimate the costs. How many times have you seen a grand design come in ahead of time and under budget. The big variable is the site development, foundations etc. Also the passivhaus market is not well developed yet so many of the products need to be imported.

    in reply to: Insulating solid concrete floor #37077
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Rob
    When insulation the suspended floor look at incorporating a air tight membrane just under the floor boards this will stop draughts and protect the insulation from spilt water. This is quite easy if you are taking up the floor boards a bit more tricky if you are doing it from underneath.

    If you do not want to chip out all the screed is it possible to batten out the floor and insulate between the battens. I have done this at a friends house and it was a great way of leveling and warming the floor. You could incorporate under floor heating at the same time.

    It can cause problems with doors depending on the room design.

    Geoff

    in reply to: Alternative to celotex and equivalents #36843
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    Going back to the original question have you seen Edenbloc by Second Nature
    http://www.edenbloc.co.uk

    Geoff

    in reply to: Data loggers and energy monitors #36756
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    You may want to look at the Wattbox which may do what you want. Have a search on Google.

    Geoff

    in reply to: eco towns & self-build #36687
    Geoff Stow
    Participant

    No idea about the self build plots but i have seen a lot of development proposals that include self build because it ticks some boxes and when the scheme comes to fruition the self build has vanished and a developer gets the plots. It certainly would be worth campaigning for some self build input. We are planning to have some input from the eco towns at this years conference so maybe we could push that a bit.

    Geoff

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)