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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)
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  • in reply to: Air to air heat pump #50098
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Pete, Sorry you had to wait so long for a reply.

    Most of my family live in Norway and use air to air heat pumps. Those living in the largest house, which is also the most exposed, have two separate systems, one serving the bedrooms and the other the rest of the house. The two systems operate independently both by time and temperature.

    As the climate warms and overheating becomes more of an issue air to air has the added advantage that it can relatively easily be used for cooling.

    I hope my thoughts prove useful.

    Tim

    in reply to: Module 5&6 homework #48950
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Does the lack of posts relating to this mean that everyone else has now successfully completed their homework?

    I have had this on ice for ages and today decided to race through the questions to see how much more reading I need to do. The answer appears to be that I need to start at the beginning again.

    in reply to: Leaking stone window sill #48828
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Rachael,

    I suggest that you look at this site: http://www.stormdry.com/
    Treating the sills should be a DIY job. Remember to remove all paint and loose material first. All exposed surfaces need treatment, not just the tops.

    Regards,
    Tim Gilbert

    in reply to: Lift available from Enfield, N. London, 13th #48778
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi David,

    I have responded to your email address with details of my itinerary and possible amendments.

    Tim

    in reply to: Lift available to Cheltenham, 16th #48514
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Diane,

    It would be a pleasure. I see from your other post that would like a lift from Burhope Farm. I am staying within walking distance of the venue so you will only be a short way off.

    I want to be in Cheltenham by lunch time but have not yet set a time. We need to arrange a schedule, pick-up, recognise each other etc. Rather than broadcasting the details I suggest that we email. Shall I contact you through your Green Footsteps email address?

    Tim

    in reply to: Solar PV slates #48401
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Chris,

    I had a brief interest in Nulok a while back but needed tiles not slates. Another company I have been in touch with is http://www.soleccosolar.com
    If you haven’t yet you could look at their products. They have some texture but are much thicker than a slate.

    Regards,
    Tim

    in reply to: IWI and original box sashes #48399
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi AJ,

    I have been waiting to see whether you get a reply from someone who knows what they are writing about. Ten days later you have not had a reply so I will discuss my thoughts as a retrofit student.

    I believe that leaving the box frame in place, or replacing with new, is storing up trouble and will seriously compromise your walls’ overall U-values.

    Voids of any sort should be avoided, even if fully sealed, which it won’t be. Air circulating within the void will very effectively transfer warmth from inside to out in the winter and vice versa in the summer, adding to any overheating. Also the walls will be cooler in winter once you retain more heat in the house with your IWI, thus increasing the risk of condensation.

    If it was my house I would grit my teeth and take the alternate option on replacing the box with insulation.

    I hope this helps and it may even trigger more responses.

    Tim

    in reply to: Solar PV slates #48398
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Christopher,

    This will depend on your timescale. Tesla are promoting a black textured toughened glass slate that may be suitable but there will be no UK deliveries until some time next year. See https://www.tesla.com/en_GB/solarroof

    Hopefully this suggestion will encourage some useful debate.

    Best of luck,
    Tim

    in reply to: Solid masonry wall with a "cavity" #47909
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Andy

    Thanks for the suggestion. Do you know whether polystyrene beads come in smaller sizes that would fit into and flow through a gap of just a few mm?

    Tim

    in reply to: Lesson 5.10 #47808
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Thanks Mark. Sorry to take so long responding.
    Tim

    in reply to: Module 4 homework #47800
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Paul,

    In question 9, The outermost face, or in the case of a floor the lowermost face, on a material in contact with the insulation is option B.

    In question 12 either my eyesight is causing a problem again or answers A and B are identical.

    In question 14 you literally have a borderline case. The reveal is 130mm. The rule says if greater than 130mm then ignore. 130mm is not greater than 130mm, therefore do not ignore.

    It’s a cruel world.

    Tim

    in reply to: Module 3 Hmk Quiz Q11 #47412
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    PS. The best solution is for you and your neighbour to jointly remove the chimney. Then you really can get rid of the whole thing and remove the risks involved in having a lump of masonry protruding from your roof. Try asking. It won’t hurt.
    Tim

    in reply to: Module 3 Hmk Quiz Q11 #47411
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Paul,

    I live in a semi, so one side is similar to a terraced house. That is the side where I could not remove the whole chimney, as the neighbour uses theirs.

    The way my builder proceeded was ro remove a slice from the chimney in the loft and support the part above with angle brackets and suitable lintel. My chimney top was capped (x3). He could then remove the lower parts of the chimney and make good. That was 33 years ago and there are no signs of problems in the remaining chimney or loft.

    The space improvement has definitely been worth the expense. Not that I remember how much it was. We would have had expense anyway to make good an already dodgy chimneybreast. I think the price difference was marginal.

    However I do know that some terraced houses have a wide flat chimney where the flues of the different buildings are interdigitated within the line of the party wall (there is probably a correct way to express that) and then you are lumbered. You can only remove your half of the chimney if all your flues, and only yours, are on your side of the party wall. Look at your roof. If you have 2 rows of pots you are probably ok. If you have one row of pots you are not.

    Remember, when making good, that there are flues the other side of the wall and use an airtight parge/plaster, particularly as your work might have compromised the airtightness of the remaining flues. Of course, they may already have been compromised for years but any flue gasses were being drawn up your now nonexistent chimney.

    Tim

    in reply to: Module 3 – your questions #47409
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi James

    To answer your question, perhaps a more general audience in one of the other forums could give better advice. Remember that you are addressing a group of students!

    For my part I would replace any lose render with something breathable but removing something fixed could cause more damage than it might treat.

    Where is the wet rot? Ground floor or higher? Not that I’d know what to do with it (yet). Where shallow crawl spaces exist there seems to be a preference in AECB to replace with a damproof and well insulated solid floor.

    Tim

    in reply to: Module 3 Hmk Quiz Q9 #47408
    Tim Gilbert
    Participant

    Hi Ben,

    That depends on how you define “contributing factor”. As far as I am concerned if all the other factors were the same and the joist were treated, or made of some inert material, then the situation wouldn’t arise, therefore it is a contributing factor.

    Actually treated timber doesn’t have an indefinite life if conditions are aggressive enough.

    Tim

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)