Carbonlite Retrofit Knowledgebase

knowledgebase : Category - Design and Construction Guidance

The SERS Report – External Wall Insulation, Current Practice Review and Guidance for Improvement

4 February 2014

This review and report undertaken on behalf of SERS Energy Solutions Ltd to understand the current standard of workmanship and quality control on site looks to analyse current practice and methods of work when undertaking external wall insulation, it applies equally to when it is located either externally or
internally. It delivers a critical assessment of current practice in the industry and provides a suggested route for improvement. This report is a combination of BRE’s extensive experience of working across the industry, working with Local Authorities, Social Landlords, and installers. It also feeds into the analysis being undertaken by the BRE on behalf of the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The study indicates that although many companies do deliver insulation works that meet the requirement of both Ofgem and PAS2020, it indicates an inconsistent approach across the company structures, in the
cases where workmanship and assessment has been observed. The weaknesses in current practice are more reflective of the current state of the external insulation industry than a direct criticism of anyone organisation or system directly and at no stage has workmanship been evidenced that is not at the current
industry standard. However for any company to be at the forefront of Best Practice, changes to procedure, process and knowledge do need to be made, and these in the view of the BRE are set out in the recommendation section of this report. SERS Energy Solutions Ltd are committed to promoting best practice processes and guidance, and commissioned the report so that it can be shared with peers and key stakeholders in the industry to further improve working methods and deliver more robust solutions. This report acknowledges the support and co-operation of all staff interviewed within numerous companies
and the input from Tim Foreman PhD researcher for Cardiff University.


Year of publication: 4 February 2014

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : The SERS Report - External Wall Insulation, Current Practice Review and Guidance for Improvement (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available

Publishing Organisation(s):


Guide to Insulating Sheathing

1 June 2014

Residential housing design continues to move towards the development of high performance sustainable building systems. To be sustainable, a building must not only be efficient and durable but also economically viable. From this, new methods of enclosure design have been examined that provide high thermal performance and long-term durability but also take opportunities to reduce material use (including waste), simplify or integrate systems and details, and potentially reduce overall initial costs of construction.
One concept relating to enclosure design is to incorporate the use exterior foam insulating sheathing into the construction of the wall assembly. As with any building enclosure system, appropriate detailing for the management of water, vapor, and energy transfer are necessary.


Year of publication: 1 June 2014

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Guide to Insulating Sheathing (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available


Author : Lonnie Haughton, Colin Murphy

Publishing Organisation(s):


Interior Insulation of Mass Masonry Walls: Joist Monitoring, Material Test Optimization, Salt Effects

1 May 2014

There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns have known solutions, but there are known knowledge gaps. Four topics were studied in more detail to address these gaps: the topics included moisture risks to embedded wood members, an examination of frost dilatometry test results for data patterns, the effect of dissolved salts on masonry durability, and optimization of the methodology of frost dilatometry testing.


Year of publication: 1 May 2014

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Interior Insulation of Mass Masonry Walls: Joist Monitoring, Material Test Optimization, Salt Effects (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available


Author : Kohta Ueno, Randt Van Straaten, Chris Schumacher

Publishing Organisation(s):


Best Time for Damp Proofing is Summer

26 July 2013

Much repair and renovation work is carried out during the summer as the warm weather allows work to progress quickly. It is the best time to undertake damp­proofing work as the ground and any structure built upon it is usually at its driest level.


Year of publication: 26 July 2013

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Best Time for Damp Proofing is Summer (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available

Publishing Organisation(s):


Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies

1 February 2012

The Building Science Corporation team held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011, at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. Featured speakers included John Straube, Christopher Schumacher and Kohta Ueno of Building Science Corporation, Henri Fennell of Building Envelope Solutions, Inc., and Mark Bomberg of Syracuse University. Some ad hoc presentations were given by practitioners in the audience as well. This was followed by a question-and-answer period and discussion.
Key results from this meeting were:



Greater understanding of the state-of-art in assessing risks or and performing interior insulation retrofit of mass masonry wall assemblies
Greater understanding of the uncertainties in assessments
Definition of key research needs to investigate and potentially reduce uncertainties.
Extensive information was presented on assessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks. It was found that conflicting understanding exists, such as general assessment approaches, assessments of masonry material properties, and the inclusion of air spaces between insulation and masonry units in hygrothermal analysis. Little research has been conducted on these issues, as well other major key issues such as the impact the architectural detailing has on rainwater concentration, timber beam pocket strategies, and below grade strategies.
The next steps are to define projects to address the research needs identified at the meeting. One upcoming retrofit was put forward as an opportunity to experiment with methodologies.


Year of publication: 1 February 2012

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available


Author : K. Ueno, R.Van Straaten

Publishing Organisation(s):


Cavity Walls — Retro-Injected Insulation — Kill or Cure?

1 October 2014

There are in excess of 17 million homes in the UK of cavity wall construction — almost 70 per cent of all domestic dwellings. Government sources suggest that almost 12 million homes now either
have built-in cavity wall insulation, or have been subject to retro-fit injection, which has seen a con- siderable increase in use over recent years in response to carbon reduction/energy conservation measures required by the Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act 2006. Retro CWI has been funded, via the government, from the main energy providers. In turn, private companies have been paid to insulate properties, often at no cost to the home owner. Retro CWI has received both good and bad press in the media and the industry is not yet subject to any form of formal government regulation, though a Code of Practice has been produced by the National Insulation Association. Any valuers/surveyors inspecting a property should be mindful of the problems incorrectly installed CWI can cause. If they fail to identify and report retro CWI and future problems arise, they could be facing a PI claim from an aggrieved homeowner discovering unexpected damp/mould growth appearing shortly after they have moved into their recently-purchased home.


Year of publication: 1 October 2014

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Cavity Walls — Retro-Injected Insulation — Kill or Cure? (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available


Author : Tim Davies

Publishing Organisation(s):


BS5250 Code of Practice for Control of Condensation in Buildings

1 December 2011

This British Standard code of practice has been published under the direction of the Basic Data and Performance Criteria for Civil Engineering and Building
Structures Standards Policy Committee and supersedes BS 5250:1989, published as a code of practice for the design of buildings. BS 5250:1989 is now
withdrawn.


Year of publication: 1 December 2011

Relevant region : UK



Status : For Sale by Publishers

Publishing Organisation(s):


Conservation Guidelines – Rising Damp and Timber Decay


Year of publication:

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Conservation Guidelines - Rising Damp and Timber Decay (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available

Publishing Organisation(s):


Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings

1 March 2012

This guidance note is one of a series which explain ways of improving the energy efficiency of roofs, walls and floors in historic buildings. The full range of guidance is available from the English Heritage website:
www.english-heritage.org.uk/partL


Year of publication: 1 March 2012

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available

Publishing Organisation(s):


Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings – Application of part L of the Building Regulations to historic and traditionally constructed buildings

2 November 2010

The guidance has been produced to help prevent conflicts between energy efficiency requirements in Part L of the Building Regulations and the conservation of historic and traditionally constructed buildings. Much of the advice will also be relevant where thermal upgrading is planned without the specific need to comply with these regulations.
This advice also acts as ‘second tier’ supporting guidance in the interpretation of the Building Regulations (referred to in paragraph 3.10 of the Approved Documents) that should be taken into account when determining appropriate energy performance standards for works to historic buildings.
This guidance supersedes English Heritage’s previous publication Building Regulations and Historic Buildings an interim guidance note on the application of part L which was prepared in support of the 2002 Regulations (revised in 2004).
WHO IS THIS GUIDANCE FOR?
 Building owners and occupiers who are considering what action they need to take to improve energy performance, and to meet or surpass a range of statutory requirements
 Architects, surveyors and similar professionals who are preparing proposals for work on traditional or historic buildings, and who need to make an appropriate professional response to requirements which can often be in conflict
 Building contractors, materials and component suppliers who need to understand the implications of decisions they make in carrying out their work, or of the technical advice they give to their customers
 Officials, such as conservation and planning officers, building control surveyors, approved inspectors, environmental health officers and housing officers, who will be experts in one area (for example building conservation, general legislation or energy performance), but may be less familiar with the balances that need to be struck in reaching reasonable solutions that suit all parties.


Year of publication: 2 November 2010

Relevant region :



  1. Download

    Document : Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings - Application of part L of the Building Regulations to historic and traditionally constructed buildings (0 bytes)

Status : Publicly available

Publishing Organisation(s):


The AECB is not responsible for the content of external sites

Keep up to date with the AECB AECB Forums

AECB Site Menu

Partners and Promotions

AECB Privacy Policy | AECB Terms & Conditions | Website by Pheriche
';